Wind Power is the Future

Blue Planet Climate Change Oceans

We cannot avoid climate change - everywhere you look our beautiful planet is being worn away by the damaging effects of a modern society. But here at Koala Chess Art HQ we know that we can turn it around. Whilst before we discussed using seaweed as a natural substitute for plastic, we are now looking at another solution: wind power. 

Wind Turbines

Technically speaking, wind is the movement of air from somewhere with high pressure to somewhere with low pressure. It’s the result of the sun unevenly heating the surface of our dear planet. We all know hot air rises, and then logic then suggests cooler air fills the void left behind. This movement of air is wind. So let’s make the most of it huh?

Surfing Koala

This surfing koala is definitely making the most of the wind

Our ancient ancestors with a taste for adventure captured wind with sails, which lead them to explore the seas. Farmers also used windmills to crush grains and pump water. In today’s world, we have wind turbines which generate electricity from the breeze. But how does it actually work?

Most wind power comes from towering turbines that can reach as high as a 20-story building. They can even blades 60 metres in length. That’s one goliath for sure! The blades come in threes and they are spun by the wind, which rotates a shaft attached to a generator and this generator produces electricity. Ta da!

Koala King Kong

Even this Koala King Kong wouldn't climb a turbine

Now imagine a whole farm of these turbines. Some wind farms can even have hundreds teamed up if they are in particularly windy areas. But, whilst turbines may not come in many different shapes, they do come in many different sizes, and smaller ones can even be installed in a backyard. One small turbine has the potential to generate enough electricity for your family home or a small business. Magic!

And the best bit about the wind? It’s completely natural. It is renewable energy that produces no pollution. Bonus - wind is also free. This means that operating a turbine is (very nearly) cost-free!

Orangutan in Hammock

Wind is not very appealing to this Orangutan comfortable in his hammock

Does this sound too good to be true? Are there any drawbacks? Well that depends on your viewpoint. Some people see turbines as ugly. Personally, at Koala Chess Art HQ, we can’t see how anything that helps our environment can be ugly. But each to their own!

Essex Wind Farm

We think this wind farm in Essex is beautiful

The turbines can, however, kill bird and bats with their rotating blades. But so do high-rise buildings, cars and power lines. So, it does require some thought, and there may be some casualties along the way.  But poisonous air and toxic water are a much more serious threat to our wildlife we believe. So the team here are of the opinion that the turbines are 100% worth it! And we aren’t the only ones:

  • In the last ten years, wind turbines have grown in popularity by around 25% a year.
  • From 2000 to 2015, wind capacity around the world increased from 17,000 megawatts to more than 430,000 megawatts.
  • In 2015, China sailed past the EU in the number of wind turbines erected and continues to lead installation efforts worldwide.

To end on a happy note, it is believed by experts that if this rate of growth continues, by 2050 ⅓ of the world’s electricity will be generated by wind power. Woohoo!

Wind Farm


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